Method Statement for the Repair of Concrete

What is Method Statement for the Repair of Concrete?

This method statement for the repair of concrete describes the details of rectification for most common construction defects of concrete structures right after the casting activity and formworks deshuttering such as concrete cracking (non-structural and structural cracks), honeycombs or spalling, pinholes and blowholes, form tie rod/ bolt holes, cone holes, and voids. Other severe defects of concrete such as major deficiencies like exposed rebars and cavities, cold joints, re-profiling, retrofitting, major cracks, etc. are not covered by this method.

What is concrete repair?

Concrete repair refers to any replacing, restoring, or renewing of concrete or concrete surfaces after initial placement. 
The need for repairs can vary from minor imperfections, such as bolt/pinholes, snap tie holes, or normal weathering, to major damage resulting from chemical or physical deterioration, water energy, or structural failure.

The essential steps of concrete repair are:

1. Determine the causes of damage
2. Evaluate the extent of the damage
3. Evaluate the need to repair
4. Select the repair method and material
5. Prepare the existing concrete for repair
6. Implement the repair method
7. Cure the repaired area properly

Causes of Concrete Damage

1. Construction Defects
Some of the more common types of damage to concrete that are caused by construction defects are rock pockets and honeycombs, form failures, dimensional errors, and finishing defects.
2. Damage due to physical impacts
3. Cracking
4. Sulfate Deterioration
5.Alkali-Aggregate Reaction
6. Deterioration Caused by Cyclic Freezing and Thawing Weather
7. Abrasion-Erosion Damage
8. Cavitation Damage
9. Corrosion of Reinforcing Steel
10. Acid Exposure
11. Structural Overloads

Types of Concrete Repair Materials

1. Portland cement mortar with an admixture
2. Portland cement concrete with an admixture
3. Micro-silica modified Portland cement concrete
4. Latex modified Portland cement
5. Polymer modified Portland cement mortar & concrete with non-sag filler
6. Steel plates or steel section
7. Fiberglass reinforced plastics (RFP)
8. Carbon strips (CFRP Laminates)
9. Epoxy mortar
10. Shotcrete
11. Epoxy Low Viscosity Injection Resin

Structured Method Statement for the Repair of Concrete

I. Description of Works
1. Introduction
This method statement defines the sequence and the control procedures for the repair of concrete defects which include but not limited to the following:
1. Concrete Cracking (Non-structural and Structural Cracks)
2. Honeycombing or Spalling
3. Pinholes and Blowholes
4. Form Tie Rod/Bolt Holes, Cone Holes and Voids
5. Removal and Repair of Temporary Construction Embedments
2. Definitions
xxxxx Client
xxxxx Project Management
xxxxx Supervising Consultant
SE Site Engineer
QC Quality Control Engineer
SF Site Foreman
PM Project Manager
HSE Manager Health, Safety & Environmental Manager
HSE Officer Health, Safety & Environmental Officer
xxxxx Main Contractor
CEMP Construction Environmental Management Plan
QCP Quality Control Plan
HSE Plan Health, Safety and Environment Plan
Note: All dimensions are in mm unless specified.
3. Reference
Project Specifications
HSE Plan
Company Environmental Management Plan
Approved Repair Materials as attached on Appendix A: Technical Data Sheets
Method Statement for Concrete Works
Material Submittal for Low Viscosity Injection Resin
4. Responsibilities
Project Manager
Responsible for accomplishing the stated project objectives which include creating clear and attainable project objectives, building the project requirements, and managing the constraints of the project management triangle, which is cost, time, scope, and quality. The Project Manager shall be responsible for the ensuring that the Project Quality plan and the Inspection and Testing procedures, method statement, HSE safety, and all contractual documentation are maintained up to date and accessible to all parties. Construction Manager
Responsible for overall construction activities ensuring that all method statement, quality, and safety procedures are implemented and required approval permits are obtained.
Site Engineer
Supervise operations in accordance with the approved method statement, shop drawings, specifications, material submittals, and schedules to achieve the acceptance of the project deliverables.
Site Supervisor Supervise closely, the activities designated to them and ensure that all instructions and safety procedure are followed and strictly adhered to. Supervise the work to ensure that technical, quality, safety and purchase order requirements are met; Attend daily site meeting and communicate his daily report with the Project/Site Engineer; Participate in the training and development of his subordinates; Organize with the Project/Site Engineer to ensure the availability of plant, equipment, and labor to his designated work activities; Closely monitor the usage of consumables and materials by his crew in order to minimize wastage; Assess the craftsmanship of subordinates under his control.
HSE Manager
Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) manager generally plan, coordinate and implement issues and directives within the organization. He ensures safe environmental working conditions for all employees.
HSE Engineer
Ensure enforcement of safety procedures in accordance with the approved HSE Plan. Will be closely monitoring the site engineer’s strict implementation of the MS and Risk Assessment, the use of proper tools and equipment to maintain safety, certifications of equipment and their adherence to safety regulations, reporting of any unsafe work or stopping work that does not comply with ES & H procedures.
HSE Officer
Monitor and control all HSE matters related with project team members and contractors in ensuring that the Project is in compliance with the project requirement i.e. specification, safety code and other policies/guidelines related to the project. Participate in HSE Risk Assessment and hold the relevant meeting, workshop internally and with related 3rd parties. Monitor and update the HSE risks register and ensure all mitigation plans are strictly adhered to throughout the project execution.
Foreman
Mason
Carpenter
Laborers

II. Concrete Repair
All concrete repairs shall be done in accordance with the approved Method Statement for Repair of Concrete (reference no. here)

chipping_concrete_repair
Manual chipping of concrete honeycomb prior to repair

1.1 General
Particular Specifications for Concrete

  1. Any defect noticed in concrete shall be rectified by methods approved by the consultant and client.
  2. This method statement shall be adopted when concrete defects are identified at the site after post-concrete work inspection specifically after stripping of the formed surface.
  3. All materials to be used for repair works shall be submitted for approval thru Material Transmittal.
  4. All proprietary materials shall be used strictly in accordance with the materials manufacturer’s instruction and/or recommendations.
  5. Curing for Concrete Patchwork:
    Polyethylene or plastic sheets shall be used to cover concrete patchwork. Unless otherwise specified in the technical data sheets, curing shall be carried out for 2-3 days. If curing compound/membrane is used, they shall be compatible with the repair products.
  6. Store unmixed materials in a cool (preferably temperature controlled) environment, avoiding exposure to direct sunlight.
  7. Keep equipment cool, arranging shade protection if necessary. It is especially important to keep cool those surfaces of the equipment, which will come into direct contact with the material itself.
  8. Try to avoid application during the hottest times of the day, arrange temporary shading as necessary.
  9. Make sufficient material, plant, and labor available to ensure that the application is a continuous process.

 1.2 Identification of Defects

  1. Surface Imperfections a. Blowholes b. Form tie rod/bolt holes, cone holds and voids
  2. Honeycombs a. Honeycomb not exposing rebars; b. Deep honeycomb exposing rebars
    2.1 Honeycombs or Spalling (Reinforcement not exposed and within the cover zone)
    The impact from a heavy object, form stripping, poor vibration, use of very stiff concrete is some of the main causes of this kind of defect.
    Surface Preparation
    a. Attention to the full and proper preparation of the substrate is essential for complete repair adhesion.
    b. Mark out the affected area, then cut back edge of repair to a minimum depth of 10 mm. Make several vertical and horizontal cutting for easy breaking of concrete. Break out the repair area to remove all contaminated or damaged concrete to a minimum depth of 10 mm, up to the pre-cut edge of the repair.
    c. Fully expose any corroded reinforcement in the repair area and continue until un-corroded steel is reached. It may be necessary to break out the concrete beyond the original repair area in order to achieve this.
    d. Oil and grease deposits are best removed by steam cleaning, detergent scrubbing or the use of a proprietary degreaser.
    e. Fully clean the concrete and steel surfaces to remove laitance, the by-products of corrosion and other contaminants. This is most effectively achieved by proprietary blast media, with particular attention required to both the rear face of the bars and the edge of the repair. The steel bars should be cleaned to a uniform bright condition and the edge of the repair should be ‘roughened’ to provide a good mechanical key at the substrate interface.
    f. Chloride-induced corrosion will further require high-pressure washing with clean water after blasting to ensure complete removal of the corrosive elements.
    Reinforcement Priming
    a. Exposed steel reinforcement should be securely held in place to avoid movement during application, as this will affect the compaction, build and bond of the mortar.
    b. Apply one full, unbroken coat of approved primer and allow drying before continuing. If unsure about continuity of the coating, apply a second coat and allow drying.
    Substrate Priming
    a. For standard repair conditions, thoroughly soak with clean water and remove excess. Apply approved substrate primer by scrubbing into the surface and allow becoming tacky.
    b. For priming in other conditions, apply approved primer as per its current instructions. 
    Mixing and Application
    a. It is essential that the approved material is thoroughly mixed and that the temperature of the mixed material should be below the maximum allowable temperature as per the approved data sheet.
    b. Mixing and application shall strictly follow the approved product data.
    c. If sagging occurs on vertical or overhead faces, the compound must be completely removed.
    d. The substrate must be reprised and compound then reapplied in layers of reduced thickness.
    e. Multiple layers can also be used to achieve the desired thickness and profile but care must be taken to ensure consistency of inter-coat bond strength.
    f. Where multiple layers are to be applied, the surface of intermediate layers should be ‘scratch- keyed’ and cured with wet hessian. Further applications of the fresh compound may be applied once the intermediate layer has reached its initial set.
    g. It can be finished by striking off with a straight edge and closing with a steel or plastic float. Note that water can be drawn to the surface if ‘overworking’ with the float occurs, and an unsightly finish may result.
    h. Damp sponges or plastic floats may be used to achieve the desired surface texture, but care should again be taken not to overwork the surface.
    i. Curing of repaired areas should be carried out as soon as possible after the surface has been closed.
    j. Approved curing compound should be spray applied in accordance with its current data sheet instructions.
    k. In adverse conditions (e.g. windy conditions or ambient temperatures greater than 30°C), supplementary curing in the form of polyethylene sheeting taped down at the edges should be used.
    2.2 Honeycombing or Spalling (Reinforcement exposed and beyond cover zone) Impact, rebar space too close, loss of grout, poor vibration and low slump are some of the main causes of this kind of defect.
    Surface Preparation 
    a. Attention to full and proper preparation of the substrate is essential for complete repair adhesion.
    b. Mark out affected area, then cut back edge of repair to a minimum depth of 10 mm.
    c. Break out the repair area to remove all contaminated or damaged concrete to a minimum depth of 10 mm, up to the pre-cut edge of the repair.
    d. Fully expose any corroded reinforcement in the repair area and continue until un-corroded steel is reached. It may be necessary to break out the concrete beyond the original repair area in order to achieve this.
    e. Oil and grease deposits are best removed by steam cleaning, detergent scrubbing or the use of a proprietary degreaser.
    f. Fully clean the concrete and steel surfaces to remove laitance, the by-products of corrosion and other contaminants. This is most effectively achieved by proprietary blast media with particular attention required to both the rear face of the bars and the edge of the repair. The steel bars should be cleaned to a uniform bright condition and the edge of the repair should be ‘roughened’ to provide a good mechanical key at the substrate interface.
    g. Chloride-induced corrosion will further require high-pressure washing with clean water after blasting to ensure complete removal of the corrosive elements.
    Reinforcement Priming
    a. Exposed steel reinforcement should be securely held in place to avoid movement during application, as this will affect the compaction and bond of the material;
    b. Apply one full, unbroken coat of approved priming and allow drying before continuing. If unsure about continuity of the coating, apply a second coat and allow drying.
    Substrate Priming – water (standard repairs)
    a. Priming with water should take place after the erection of the formwork.
    b. Several hours prior to placing the approved substrate primer, the prepared concrete substrates should be saturated, by filling the formwork.
    c. With clean water. Immediately prior to application of approved substrate primer, any excess water should be removed via the drainage outlet, leaving the substrate “saturated surface dry”.
    d. Different substrate priming shall be selected and approved depending upon defect like chloride contaminated concrete etc. Application of the same shall be done in strict accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
    Formwork
    a. Formwork should be constructed such that the unrestrained surface area of the repair is minimized.
    b. The formwork should be rigid and tight to the substrate to prevent grout loss. Use of silicone sealant, or similar, is also advised around the edge of the formwork.
    c. The internal faces of the formwork should be sealed, using an approved release agent, to ensure that water is not absorbed from the repair material by the formwork.
    d. The formwork should include suitable drainage outlets for pre-soaking and, when filling the repair ‘bottom up’ (e.g. soffit repairs), should further include provision for air-venting to release trapped air as pouring proceeds.
    e. There must be suitable access points to pour or pump the mixed material in place.
    Mixing, Placing and Curing
    a. It is essential that mixing is done following the approved product data sheet.
    b. Limits of the repair geometry should be in accordance with that laid down in the ‘Design criteria’ section of the approved product data sheet.
    c. Placement should be a continuous process, to avoid the formation of a ‘cold joint.
    d. If placing by the pump, the pipeline should be ‘grouted’ with a rich cement slurry or mortar, discharging such grout as waste.
    e. Pumping of the mixed material should follow immediately after grouting has been carried out.
    f. Formwork should be left in place until the cured grouting area has reached a self-supporting, compressive strength, or as otherwise advised by the Engineer.
    g. Immediately after the formwork has been struck, all exposed faces of the repair should be thoroughly soaked with clean water to remove residual traces of the shutter release agent.
    h. At ambient temperatures above 30°C supplementary curing in the form of polyethylene sheeting, taped down at the edges, must be used.
  3. Cracks
    a. The dry/damp crack is identified as per structure elements as below:
    b. Cracks equal or larger than 0.20mm on External Walls and Side part of Base Slabs c. On all other elements i. Non-structural Cracks equal or greater than (>) 0.20mm, but () 0.2mm
    d. Wet Cracks: Wet cracks are the type of defects caused by faulty construction work, especially in waterproofing work. 
    3.1 Non-Structural Concrete Cracks
    As the surface of concrete dries, water evaporates from the spaces between particles. As this water dissipates, the particles move closer together, resulting in shrinkage of the concrete. Because the surface of a concrete slab is exposed to air but the underlying concrete is not, concrete near the surface dries and shrinks at a rate different from that of the underlying concrete. The underlying concrete acts as a restraint to shrinkage, resulting in cracking of the surface layer.
    resin_crack_injection
    Resin crack injection activity on the slab concrete
    Surface Preparation
    a. Generally, surface preparation includes removal of all loose surface deposited material by wire brush. The prepared areas must be free of dirt, oil and other contaminants & be thoroughly cleaned by dry air, oil-free compressed air.
    b. Remove from substrate all traces of dust, oil, paint, laitance and other deleterious materials that might affect subsequent bonding.
    c. Mark the defective area, V-cut to a minimum depth (as required by repair material manufacturers) & break out the repair area to remove all contaminated or damage concrete.
    d. Immediately prior to application of repair material, the prepared substrate should be cleaned by oil-free compressed air.
    Priming
    Water Priming: Soak the substrate with clean water.
    Excess water shall be removed and leave the substrate in a saturated surface dry condition. More soaking time is required for poor quality concrete.
    For large structural repair, soak the substrate for several hours after formworks installation.
    Mixing/Application/Finishing/Curing
    a. Pre-packed repair materials shall be mixed as per manufacturer’s recommendation.
    b. Apply repair material and allow to partly setting before finally trowelling to a smooth finish. In any case, follow the manufacturer’s manual.
    c. Curing not generally required but in extreme drying conditions, must be placed within 30 minutes after mixing and placement are done in a continuous process to avoid cold joint.
    d. Removal and repair of exposed surfaces and curing shall be carried out as per manufacturer’s recommendation.
    e. Thickness applied shall be as per manufacturer product data sheet finish using steel or plastic float.
    f. Damp sponges can also be used to achieve required surface texture.
    g. Proper curing by means of wet hessian cloth covered by polythene sheet or use approved applicable curing materials as per manufacturer’s recommendation.
    h. Inspection Request shall be submitted after completion of works.
    3.2 Structural Concrete Cracks
    The impact from heavy objects, early stripping of formworks or shoring and disturbance while at the initial setting of concrete is some of the major causes of this type of crack. All the Structural cracks (cracks more than 0.2mm width) which are beyond the reinforcement zone or through cracks larger than 0.2mm width, the injection will be carried out by approved material and after successful completion of the injection, all the packers will be removed and the surface will be finished by approved material. 
    Crack injection shall be done as follows:
    a. Remove surface laitance and contaminants from a bond 50 mm wide centered on the crack, using power wire brushing or high-pressure air jetting. Identify the nature of the crack and investigate the extent and magnitude of the crack by making a V-groove cut 25 mm deep along the crack line. Remove surface dust & laitance by high-pressure air jetting.
    b. Surface cracks extending to bar reinforcement and excess of 0.2 mm in width and 25 mm in depth shall be injected by a low viscosity epoxy resin.
    c. If packers are being used, drill holes along the center of crack to accept the packers. The centers should be 1-1.5 times the depth of the crack, but not more than 200 mm.
    d. Surface Preparation:
         1. Clean the surface and remove all traces of dust, oil, paint, curing compounds, grease, corrosion deposits, algae or any unsound material.
        2. The surface should be preferably prepared by using high-pressure water jetting or light abrasive blasting, followed by thorough washing to remove dust and remaining particles.
        3. Oil and grease deposits are best removed by steam cleaning, detergent scrubbing or the use of a proprietary degreaser.
    e. Mixing:
        1. The hardener and the base resin should be thoroughly mixed manually until the liquid becomes clear.
        2. Crack injection material should be used with standard injection equipment having closed containers at an injection pressure of 0.4N/mm² (4 bar).
        3. Mix only sufficient material that can be used within the pot life of the material. (Refer to Technical Data Sheet).
    f. Application:
        1. Crack injection material should be injected using standard injection equipment having closed containers.
        2. Injection packers should be inserted into the pre-drilled holes at intervals along the length of the crack. The distance between each packer shall depend on the length and width of the crack.
        3. If practical, seal the surface of the cracks between the packers with approved sealer material, 30 to 40 mm wide and 2 to 3 mm thick. Both sides of the cracks, which lead through a wall or slab, shall be sealed this way. If the water flow is severe the sealer application can be omitted.
        4. In case of a wall or slab which is cracked all the way through, packers shall be located on both sides with those at the back placed at midway points between those at the front.
        5. One end of the injection hose shall be attached to the lowest packer on vertical cracks or to either end of horizontal cracks.
        6. Each crack shall be treated in a single continuous operation and sufficient material shall, therefore, be made prior to the commencement of the work.
        7. Remove the packers or nipples and make good any holes or voids with sealer and allow curing. The sealer can then be ground off or softened with a blowlamp and peeled off. Make sure that it does not burn.
        8. Upon completion of the injection works, the injection system shall be allowed to cure for 24 hours and shall be left undisturbed for this time.
    Crack Repair by Gravity Feed:
    a. Clearly, mark the cracks to be repaired.
    b. Rake the crack to widen it to minimum 5mm wide and 10 mm deep.
    c. Clean the crack with compressed air/air blower to remove loose deposits and fine dust.
    d. Use a stopper on both sides of the crack using a sealant or cement sand mortar or sealant to create a reservoir.
    e. After preparing the surface, mix Crack injection material as per the instructions is given in the product datasheet. If the cracks run all the way through the underside of slab/beam, seal the underside of crack with sealer. Allow sealer to cure for minimum 12 hours.
    f. Pour the mixed material (within the pot life of the resin) over the top of the crack and allow it to penetrate. Keep filling the cracks until they will no longer accept resin. For flood coat applications, distribute the resin evenly over the surface initially and then puddle the resin over the cracks. On smooth surfaces, use wire brush or rollers to promote penetration.
    g. Inspect the filling. Look for signs of penetration such as air bubbles escaping from the cracks as the resin displaces the air. ALLOW TIME FOR PENETRATION. Twenty to 30 minutes should be a minimum. Also, be aware that several minutes may pass before resin has fully penetrated tight cracks and more resin may still be required.
    h. Once all cracks have been filled to refusal, remove the excess surface resin with a flat rubber squeegee.
    i. After the grout has fully cured, remove sealant/sand mortar stopper and grind smooth.
  4.  Form Tie Rod/Bolt Holes/Cone Holes and Voids
    a. Probable Cause/s: Sleeves, Insufficient curing
    b. Make sure that the substrate surface must be free from oil, grease or any loosely adherent material; a. If the concrete surface is defective or has laitance, it must be cut back to a sound base; b. Bolt holes or fixing pockets must be blown clean of any dirt or debris
    c. Bearing Plate/Base Plate a. The underside of the base plate should be clean and free from oil, grease, rust, scale or other loosely adherent material; b. It may be necessary to provide air pressure relief holes to allow venting of any isolated high spots; c. If leveling shims are to be removed once the approved grout has hardened, then they should be pretreated with a thin layer of grease.
    d. Formwork – General
          1. Before fixing any formwork, ensure that the area to be grouted is clean.
          2. The formwork itself must be constructed to be leak proof, to prevent any possible grout loss. This can be achieved by using a foam rubber strip or mastic sealant beneath the formwork, and at any joints in the formwork. It shall, however, also be provided with drain holes and plugs.
         3. The formwork should also be constructed in such a way as to keep the final, unrestrained surface area of the grout to a minimum, to avoid problems with cracking at a later stage.
        4. It should be fixed in such a way as to allow easy stripping, without causing damage or distress to the grout – particularly if this is to be done whilst the grout is still green.
        5. All dirt and debris to be removed from the grout area before the last piece of formwork are fixed, to facilitate pre-soaking.
    e. Formwork – Geometry a. Pouring side: Set up so that grout will be poured the shortest distance across the base plate. Erected a maximum of 150 mm from the base plate edge. Erected a minimum of 150 mm higher than the underside of the base plate. b. Open Side: Set up directly opposite the pouring side. Erected a maximum of 50 mm from the plate edge. Erected a minimum of 25 mm from the underside of the plate. c. Flanking Sides: Set flush with the plate edge. Close attention to, grout tightness” of the formwork.
    f. Pre-Soaking a. All concrete surfaces within the formwork area should be saturated with clean, fresh water for several hours prior to grouting. b. Immediately before grouting takes place, any free water should be removed. Particular care should be taken to blow out all bolt holes and pockets.
    g. Mixing a. Mixing shall be done as per approved repair material technical data sheet.
    h. Placing
         1. It is essential that the machine mixing capacity, material supply, and labor availability is adequate to enable the grouting operation to be carried out continuously. This may require the use of a holding tank, with provision for gentle agitation to maintain fluidity;
        2. Immediately prior to placement, the mixed grout should be briefly agitated to release any surface tension.
        3. Placing shall be done depending upon the thickness of filling referring to approved product data.
        4. Any bolt pockets must be grouted prior to grouting between the substrate and the base plate.
        5. Continuous grout flow during the grouting operation is essential. Sufficient grout must be available prior to start, and time taken to pour a batch must be regulated to the time taken to prepare the next one.
        6. The mixed grout should be poured only from one side of the void to eliminate the entrapment of air or surplus pre-soaking water.
        7. The grout head must be maintained at all times so that a continuous grout front is achieved.
        8. When the grout reaches the open side of the formwork and rises above the underside of the base plate, pouring should continue slowly down the length of the base plate until completed.
    i. Finishing a. Wherever possible unrestrained “shoulders” are to be avoided. These have a tendency to crack and/or deboned, due to their unrestrained nature; b. The gap between the perimeter formwork should not exceed 150 mm on the pouring side and 50 mm on the opposite side. It is advisable where practical to have no gap at the flank sides.
    j. Curing On completion of the grouting operation, all exposed areas of grout should be thoroughly cured. Using approved curing compound, continuous application of water and/or wet hessian.
    k. In summary along with standard practice, methods described by the approved manufacturer shall be followed in strictly.
  5. Filling of Core Holes
    a. Prepare the core hole by removing dust, loose particles, grease, oil and traces of foreign materials which may affect the adhesion of the mortar on the concrete.
    b. Wash the area with water by copiously spraying just a few hours before the application of the mortar. At the time of application, the area should be free from water but still damp.
    c. Mixing of the repair material shall be done as per the manufacturer’s technical datasheet.
    d. Place the approved micro-concrete or approved repair material inside the hole by gravity pouring and use a trowel for better finishing.
    e. Upon filling the hole, the surface should be kept moistened by curing it with cool water for 3 days. Protect the surface from wind or excessive heat or properly secured plastic sheeting during the curing period.
    f. If required, formwork shall be provided based on site need as specified on “Formwork – General” and “Formwork – Geometry”. Note: These steps are for guidelines only. The manufacturer’s specifications/instructions supersede the above steps.
  6. Pinholes and Blowholes
    Probable Cause/s: Insufficient Vibration, High W/C Ratio
    a. Attention to the full and proper preparation of the substrate is essential for complete repair adhesion.
    b. The substrate should further be ‘roughened’ to remove excess laitance, to expose pinholes & blowholes and to provide a mechanical key for subsequent application of approved material. This is most effectively achieved by the use of proprietary blast media, such that the fine aggregate is exposed but not polished. Where preparation techniques result in voids of greater than 10 mm depth, alternate method and material shall be used as an approved material datasheet.
    c. Immediately prior to the application of approved material, the prepared substrate should be blown clean with oil-free compressed air.
    d.Substrate priming shall be done following the procedure mentioned in an approved material-technical datasheet. Small quantities (up to 5 kg) can be mixed manually but large quantities of special tools referring to the manufacture’s procedure shall be obtained and used.
    e. The application of repair material shall be done strictly in accordance with the manufacturer’s datasheet.
    f. Curing shall be followed according to the manufacturer’s specifications.
  7. Removal and Repair of Construction Temporary Embedments
    All temporary construction embedments such as temporary mechanical or electrical sleeves, block-outs, etc. shall be removed and repaired using suitable approved repair materials and as per the manufacturer’s recommendation.
    a. After removal of any temporary embedments, remove any loose areas, laitance and any foreign materials that will affect the bonding of repaired materials.
    b. If the embedded item reached the location of reinforcement, ensure to remove any rust formation not only on the exposed surface but also on the rear side of the reinforcement bars.
    c. Apply corrosion treatment prior to start the repair.
    d. Proceed on the application of approved suitable materials as required.
    e. Curing shall be done as per the approved curing process or as recommended by the manufacturer.

III. Risk Assessment Please refer to the attached document in Appendix B.

IV. Permit and Licensing Requirements Necessary permits shall be obtained.

V. Drawings, Diagrams, Maps and Survey Data Sketch shall be attached to the submitted INR.

VI. Pre-Start Safety Briefing Arrangements Refer to Risk Assessment in Appendix B.

  1. Protective and Safety Equipment All workers Involved shall be equipped with adequate PPE as stated below: a. Safety Helmet with Company Logo b. Safety Boots c. High Visibility Vest d. Safety Goggles e. Face Mask f. Hand Gloves g. Coveralls
  2. Information to Personnel a. Safety Induction b. Job training c. Superintendents Notices/Memos d. Toolbox talks e. STARRT Card
  3. Special Safety Requirements
    a. All necessary personal/protective equipment (PPE) be provided.
    b. Banksman, wearing distinctive vests, shall be assigned to help operators maneuver their equipment.
    c. The equipment operators shall possess the required licenses and certificates.
    d. Generated dust shall be controlled by periodic water spraying.
    e. The project safety officer is responsible along with the project zone site engineer for ensuring that all operations are carried out with due regard to the safety of all project personnel & property.
    f. All working activity shall comply with Client Safety Procedure.
    g. First Aid Material.
    h. General management of protection/operation hazards is to be observed.
    i. In case of working at night, please refer to Method Statement for Night Works
  4. Emergency Procedures The Flow Chart below shows the Emergency Contact No. during work:
  5. Emergency Contact Numbers
    Supervision and Monitoring Arrangements
    Construction Manager
    He is in charge of all construction activities. Schedule the project in logical steps and budget time required to meet deadlines. Inspect and review projects to monitor compliance with building and safety codes and other regulations.
    Site Engineer
    The Site Engineer shall evaluate the number of materials consumed by each trade to be compared against planned quantity.
    Site Foreman
    A construction foreman is responsible for supervising the workers and also doing actual construction work. The foreman monitors employees to ensure that the work is done efficiently and within quality standards.
    QA/QC Engineer
    The QA/QC Engineer shall monitor whether the installation works is conforming to the required quality otherwise he shall notify the Site Engineer should he found nonconformance to the ongoing activities. The Site Engineer shall immediately rectify the work to avoid receipt of NCR from the QA/QC Engineer.
    HSE Engineer
    The Safety Engineer shall be full time at the site and shall frequently visit all the ongoing works at site. All safety violations and on-conformance of the HSE Plan shall be registered and immediate action shall be done in coordination with the Site Engineer.
    HSE Officer
    Monitor and control all HSE matters related with project team members and contractors in ensuring that the Project is in compliance with the project requirement i.e. specification, safety code and other policies/guidelines related to the project. Participate in HSE Risk Assessment and hold a relevant meeting, workshop internally and with related 3rd parties. Monitor and update the HSE risks register and ensure all mitigation plans are strictly adhered to throughout the project execution. Note: Site Engineers / HSE Staff shall have access on-site to each MS/RA. Consultants will monitor activities on site based on the MS/RA. XI. Environment and Quality Issues
  6. Precautionary Measure All precautionary measures shall be briefed to all workers prior to commence activity
  7. Disposal Requirements All waste shall be disposed of as per the Construction Environmental Management Plan and as per Government approved disposal areas.

VII. Inspection, Test, and Sampling
Request for Inspection and Testing will be submitted prior and after execution of works.

VIII.Quality Assurance Requirements Table
Refer to the Project Quality Plan
a. Project Specifications

IX. Attachments
References (attach here)
Documentation (attach here)
Project Specifications (attach here)
Appendices:
Appendix A-Material Technical Data Sheet (attach here)
Appendix B-Risk Assessment
Risk_Assessment_Repair_Concrete
Appendix C-Inspection and Test Plan
ITP_Concrete_Repair_a
ITP_Concrete_Repair_b
ITP_Concrete_Repair_1.pdf
ITP_Concrete_Repair_2.pdf

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